The Motril Conundrum

MOT Local Elections 2019In Motril, the PP under Luisa García Chamorro (ex-mayor) was the most voted candidate, winning for her party eight seats on the Town Council.

However, that’s two seats fewer than in 2015, which has been the general trend for this party across the whole of Spain.

Even though the PP took ten seats in 2015, they were still denied the Mayoralty by an opposition coalition between the PSOE and the PA.

These two parties, however, have fared badly owing to the attrition over four years in power: Mayor Flor Almón (PSOE) dropped from seven councillors to six and Antonio Escámez (MÁS Motril) dropped two seats from five to just three. The emergence of Andalucía por Sí (Axsí) under David Martín cost Sr. Escámez votes – probably the two seats that he lost, which Axsí picked up.

Other new arrivals on the municipal political playingfield are Ciudadanos (2) and Vox (2), whilst the veteran IU lost one of its seats and now has only two, as well.

It’s worth pointing out that Axsí’ needed 2,200 votes to pick up two seats, whereas Vox’s two seats only cost them 1,500 votes – such are the peculiarities of the D’hondt electoral system.

MOT Local Elections Graph 2019What this all means is that the PP, using its successful tripartite arrangement (PP/Ciudadanos/Vox)  used to secure the Andalusian Regional Government; that’s to say La Junta, will still fall short of an absolute majority, as it would only give them 12 seats – one short of the necessary 13 seats.

The Mayor, Flor Almón, on the other hand would need a 4-party coalition: PSOE, PMAS, Axsí and IU which would give them the 13 seats but… there is little chance of PMAS and Axsí agreeing to be in the same team, perhaps.

Stranger things happen at sea, so somehow, some sort of coalition, governing council has to emerge. And believe it or not, much will depend on the formation of the National Government and several regional pacts between the PP, Ciudadanos and Vox.

(News: Motril, Costa Tropical, Granada, Andalucia)

  2 comments for “The Motril Conundrum

  1. May 28, 2019 at 7:49 am

    Yes, it’s used from national to local level. When it was first brought in, Democracy had just returned to Spain and it was felt that the formation of stable political parties was paramount, so these extra seats going to bigger established parties are the result.

    It all boils down to the fact that you cannot divide a seat between two or more parties, so that the party with the most votes gets it.

    Many think that it is unfair and should be dropped. It

  2. Malcolm
    May 28, 2019 at 7:28 am

    Is the d’Hondt electoral system standard for all Spanish elections? I notice that it it is used in Great Britain but not Northern Ireland so wondered if if was a choice or compulsory. Either way, not being of a mathematical mind it is a struggle to understand!

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